RV 6 November One Niner Charlie Delta
EXPERIMENTAL !
(RV 6 S/N 20406)
 
This Being the
 
PILOTS OPERATING HANDBOOK
&
FLIGHT MANUAL
For the aforementioned aircraft
 
Rev. B : 2nd Post-Test Flight Edition
by
Christopher M. Anderson
B.S. 1963, University of Arizona, FBK, Ph.D. 1968 California Institute of Technology
Professor of Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Member of the American Astronomical Society and the International Astronomical Union
Co-Investigator on the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo Polarimeter Experiment (Astro-1, STS 35 and Astro-2, STS 67)
Private Pilot, Single Engine Land with an Instrument Rating
Member of the Experimental Aircraft Association ( 279026) and of the
Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (953515)
and
Builder, Owner , & Pilot
Of the Subject Aircraft

 

 

 

CONTENTS

Title Page ......................................................................................... i
Contents ........................................................................................ ii
Foreword........................................................................................ iii
I. General Description of the Project .......................................................... 1

II. Systems and Equipment List ................................................................... 3
A. Cockpit Instruments and Controls ........................................................ 3
B. Control Functionality ................................................................................ 7
C. Electrical System ........................................................................................ 8
D. Fuel System ............................................................................................... 12
E. Engine and Propeller ............................................................................... 12
F. Pitot Static System .................................................................................. 14
G. Vacuum (Gyro Drive) System ............................................................ 14

III.Weights and Balance .............................................................................. 16

IV. Operating Procedures............................................................................. 19

V. Performance .............................................................................................. 26

VI. Specifications............................................................................................ 27

VII.Maintenance..............................................................................................28

                             FIGURES

I-1 Aircraft Schematic .................................................................................. 2
II-1 Control and Instrument Layout ......................................................... 4
II-2 Circuit Breaker Panel Layout ............................................................. 5
II-3 Flap / Trim Warthog Schematic ........................................................ 9
II-4 Flap / Trim Warthog Perf-Board Pin Map .................................. 10
II-5 Electrical System Schematic ............................................................. 11
II-6 Fuel System Schematic ....................................................................... 13
II-7 Pitot Static System Schematic .......................................................... 15

                                            TABLE

II-1 Equipment List ........................................................................................ 6

 

 

 

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FORWORD

This volume has been assembled at the end of a five and a half year project to satisfy the known expectation of the FAA Manufacturing Inspection Satellite Office examiner for a Pilots Operating Handbook and/or Flight Manual. It is not intended to replace nor will it for the most part duplicate either the instructions and plans provided by the kit vendor , the extensive construction log compiled by the builder over the course of the project, or the installation, operation and maintenance manuals provided with many of the subsystems of the aircraft. Rather it is intended as a description of those aspects of this particular realization of the RV6 of immediate concern to a pilot thereof. Furthermore it is not, and in some sense never will be, a finished product but rather is an evolving document. After all, one of the attractions of the experimental, homebuilt category of aircraft is, at least to some of us, that we can continue to refine the ship as we come to know it through the miracle flight.

No project of this magnitude is accomplished by one person alone and this one is no exception. The number of persons to be thanked is legion. An indispensable corps of helpers was provided by the members of EAA Chapter 93 of Madison, WI. Especially helpful among these were Daryl Elam, George Bindl, Garry Grosskreuger, Harry Field and Jim Martin. The kit vendor, Van's Aircraft, Inc., is to be thanked for help when it was needed which was happily seldom as the airframe kit is very good. Lyle Marty and Dave Hoffman, machinist at the University of Wisconsin Department of Astronomy provided much needed advice, indulged my use of various machines, and did no small amount of "government work" on the machines of the Department which contributed much to the professional appearance of many of the custom subsystems of the aircraft. Bob Beckman and Rick Lemon created Madison T-Handers Inc. at exactly the perfect time and have been very supportive. Most of all there is my family. My two lovely daughters were most indulgent while this project occupied me through the last years of their high school and most of their college experience. They were always enthusiastic and willing to lend a hand where they could. My wonderful mother-in-law, Catherine Nemec, was generous to a fault and indulged us even though I'm sure she is afraid to death of our being in small airplanes. Finally and most especially my wife, Dorothy, who was a major contributor to the project and, as a pilot, was as keen as I to get it flying. I've seen so many other builders who's spouses were somewhere between apathetic and openly hostile to those projects that it makes my heart swell with pride and love when I think of what a lucky fellow I am.

 

iii

 

I. General Description of the Project

The RV 6 is a single engine, low wing monoplane with conventional landing gear (i.e. it is a "tail dragger") and traditional (wings in front, stabilizers aft) planform. The airframe is of riveted aluminum construction. The engine cowl and various fairings etc. are of fiberglass. It is powered by a conventional aircraft engine and propeller. The aircraft was designed by Richard Van Grunsven (commonly known as "Van") and the particular example of the design herein described was built from a kit marketed by Van's Aircraft, Inc. of North Plains in the state of Oregon. For more information on the design, the designer, the kit and for descriptions of numerous other examples the reader is referred to Sport Aviation magazine.

The seed for this project was sewn in August 1986, when the builder was introduced by a friend to the EAA Annual Fly-in, Convention and Sport Aviation Exposition in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Soon there after flying lessons were begun and the builder received his private pilot's certificate in July, 1987, having taken all instruction in Piper aircraft. (Roughly 28 hours of flight had been logged by the builder in 1960 in an Aeronca Champ, but that is ancient history). Soon there after the builder and his spouse began to dream of a traveling aircraft of substantially higher performance than the club Cherokee's available to them. The possibilities were investigated seriously at Oshkosh '87. Various building techniques, wood, fiberglass and welded steel were considered and rejected for a variety of reasons. Experiments with aluminum were far more encouraging and this medium was selected for further study. Two seats was essential and the tandem seating configuration deemed unacceptable, especially to the spouse. As a first time builder a kit as opposed to a plans built project was decided upon. At the time this basically reduced the field to the Bushby Mustang II and the RV6. Both were studied, and the RV6 was the clear favorite for a variety of reasons but most importantly the robustness of the kit vendor's firm. Finally at Oshkosh '88 the builder received a demo ride in the factory prototype RV6 (piloted by Van himself) and within minutes of landing the first of the kits was ordered. That was received within the month and work began immediately in September, 1988. On December 17, 1993, the 90th anniversary of the Wright Brothers first flight, the FAA mandated data plate bearing this date was riveted to the fuselage and the aircraft declared finished after 3535 person-hours of labor. The full history of the construction is contained in a generously illustrated construction log book.

In the remainder of this manual the following subjects will be described in detail. Section II will describe the systems and special equipment of this aircraft. Section III will be the required weights and balances section. Section IV will describe normal, alternate and malfunction operating procedures and Section V will contain performance information. Section VI will contain a full listing of specifications and Section VII will describe maintenance procedures.

1

II. Systems and Equipment

A. Cockpit Instruments and Control Layout

The primary interface between pilot and aircraft is the cockpit instrumentation and controls. The layout of the instrument panel and the circuit breaker panel in RV6 N19CD are illustrated in Figures II-1 and II-2. Table II-1 is a full equipment list.

Figure II-1 shows the layout of the instrument panel. Instruments are numbered while controls are designated by upper case letters and switches and potentiometers are identified by lower case letters. In the text that follows references to these items are given in curly brackets thus: {x}. The figure is largely self explanatory and the devices are largely conventional in nature, operation and location. However, we note below several special aspects of the layout and the manuals for various instruments ,where they exist, are archived under separate cover.

For reasons of panel space the "engine" instrument (as opposed to the flight instruments) are separated with those of most immediate concern to the pilot, fuel quantity {2} and fuel {3} and oil pressure {4} along with the clock {1} on the left; the tachometer{19}, manifold {18} and vacuum {22} pressure gauges, volt/amp meter {20} and temperature monitor {21} on the right. The layout of the flight instruments deviates from the traditional "T" . The airspeed indicator (ASI) {11} has been moved from the top, left side of the "T" to a more central location for the benefit of the right side co-pilot. The vertical speed indicator (VSI ) {5} which is normally below the right cross of the "T" takes the place of the ASI and it's place is used for the main navigation head {10} placing it next to the heading indicator {8} for better access in the instrument flying scan.

The flaps of N19CD are electrically operated with the actuator switch {i} central in the panel on the switch row and are provided with a position read out above the radio stack{24} Zero to four LEDs are activated by micro switches sensing a cam positioned on the flap torque tube indicated increasing degrees of deployment. This same indicator subpanel contains the center/limit indicator for the two axis electric trim system.

Pitch trim of this RV6 is provided by a conventional trim tab on the left elevator.  Originally roll was trimmed by tension springs attached to the aileron actuator under the seat floor. In the spring of 1998 the simple turn coordinator {6} was replaced with a S-Tec System 20 single axis autopilot the servo mortor for which was placed wher the Mac trim roll motor had been.  A trim tab consisting of a 6-inch section of 1-inch width piano hinge was added to the right aileron outboard trailing edge and the Mac trim servo placed in the aileron skin via doubler plates.  Balance of the aileron was restored by partial filling of the original design aileron counter weight, a piece of iron water pipe no less, with a lead shot & epoxy slurry.  At this same time the rudimentary heading indicator {8} was replaced with a Sigma-Tec Auto Pilot DG w/ heading bug.  Both tim tabs  are actuated solely by MacTM trim motors which are in turn activated by four way rocker "coolie hat" switches{o} on the top of either control stick. Next these switches are miniature push-to-talk buttons {n} for the radios.

Outside vet air can be directed individually by each occupant of the cockpit by standard air-ball valves {L}

Figure II-2 shows the lay out of the circuit breaker subpanel which is located on the forward cockpit floor between the two pilots.

3

Table II-1

EQUIPMENT LIST

Item, Ref Fig II-1 Source_______________________________

1. Digital Clock /Timer, A/CS&S1 p/n LC-2
2. Fuel Quantity Gauge, A/CS&S p/n 2DA4
3. Fuel Pressure Gauge, A/CS&S p/n 82320
4. Oil Pressure Gauge, A/CS&S p/n AN5771-2
5. Vertical Speed Indicator, A/CS&S p/n 10-20400
6. Auto Pilot w/ Turn Coordinator   S-Tek System 20
7. Attitude Indicator,  A/CS&S p/n 10-22985
8. Auto Pilot Directional Gyro   Sigma-Tek p/n 1U262-003-14 PMA
9. Altimeter A/CS&S p/n 10-04400
10. Nav 1, Head Narco IDME 891
11. Airspeed Indicator, A/CS&S p/n 10-02600
12. Nav / Comm 2 Narco Escort II
13. Audio Panel/Marker Beacon Narco CP 135
14. Nav / Comm 1 Narco NSC812
15. Transponder, Mode C Narco AT150
16.  GPS,  Garmin 55 w/ A.A.F.3 mount system
17. Magnetic Compass A/CS&S p/n C2300
18. Manifold Pressure Gauge E.I.I.2 p/n M1
19. Volt / Amp Meter E.I.I. p/n VA-1A
20. Tachometer E.I.I. p/n R-1
21. Temperature Monitor E.I.I. p/n US-8A
22. Vacuum Suction Gauge A/CS&S p/n 10-01000
23. Vac Pressure Low Light Precise Flight p/n
24. Trim & Flap Position Indicator A.A. F. 3 T/FPI Mark I

Items Not Depicted in Figure II-1 which are relevant to and included in the Weight & Balance measurement

25. Gill Aircraft Battery (24V) A/CS&S p/n G-241 (PS12-9M)
26. E L T Narco 910
27. Intercom Flightcom II SX
28. Blind Altitude Encoder Narco AR 850
29. Right Rudder Peddle Extenders A.A.F. RRPE-2in
30. 2 Muffin Canopy Fans Digi-Key Corp. p/n CR006-ND
31. Emergency Hand Held Radio Bendix King KX99

Footnotes:

1. A/CS&S = Aircraft Spruce and Specialty Company. 1992-1993 Catalog
2. E.I.I. = Electronic Instruments International
3. A.A.F. = "Anderson Aircraft Factory" i.e. a homegrown, custom device

6

 

B. Control Functionality

Primary roll, pitch and yaw control of the RV6 are accomplished in the conventional manor by means of ailerons, elevators and a rudder respectively. The ailerons and elevators are controlled by either of the fully dual sticks between the legs of each occupant. The sticks are connected to the control surfaces by push-pull tubes and bell cranks all ends of which are terminated with rod-end ball bearings turning on AN3 aircraft bolts retained by fiber lock nuts. The rudder is articulated by cables attached to dual rudder pedals which are also equipped with toe break actuators. All primary control surface are connected to the airframe by ball bearing hinges or rod end bearings turning on AN3 aircraft bolts retained by fiber lock nuts.

Pitch trim is accomplished by means of a conventional trim tab on the left elevator. The tab is attached to the elevator by piano hinge. Tab actuation is by means of a MacTM trim motor mounted on the aft fuselage deck beneath the vertical stabilizer and connected to same by a flexible "Boden" push-pull cable. Initially roll trim was accomplished by a "bungie" tensioning system attached to the stick hinges under the cockpit floor. The spring tension is adjusted by another MacTM trim motor. In the spring of 1998 the simple turn coordinator  was replaced with a S-Tec System 20 single axis autopilot, the servo mortor for which was placed where the Mac trim roll motor had been.  A trim tab consisting of a 6-inch section of 1-inch width piano hinge was added to the right aileron outboard trailing edge and the Mac trim servo placed in the aileron skin via doubler plates.  Balance of the aileron was restored by partial filling of the original design aileron counter weight, a piece of iron water pipe no less, with a lead shot & epoxy slurry.  Both trim motors are activated by the rocker "coolie" hat switches on the top of each of control sticks. Trim motor motion center position and limits are enunciator on a display immediately above the radio stack on the instrument panel.

The aircraft is equipped with roughly half span flaps attached to the wing aft spar by piano hinge and actuated by a lever-torque tube arrangement between and behind the pilot and co-pilot seats. Flap motion is accomplished by an electrical linear actuator the switch for which is located in the center bottom of the instrument panel. Flap deployment is encoded by a cam attached to the torque tube which successively closed up to four micro-switches. The number of closed micro switches is shown by light emitting diodes (LED)on the enunciator display above the radio stack, none for fully retracted flaps and four for fully deployed flaps. Flap angle is roughly 10 degrees per illuminated LED.

The trim motors, the enunciator display and flap actuation and encoding are interconnected in a "Warthog" box of mind boggling compactness and complexity the schematics for which are given in Figures II-3 and II-4. In an astounding violation of Murphy's Law this warthog box, which was designed and fabricated by the aircraft builder, a certified 12-thumb klutz when it comes to things electrical, worked perfectly in every respects on the first try....

Power system controls are also of a conventional nature with the ignition switch, throttle, carburetor heat, mixture, primer and fuel selector arranged in a vertical stack between the pilots and below the instrument panel. Throttle, carburetor heat and mixture adjustments are by means of Boden flexible push-pull cables. The throttle has a twist vernier and the mixture a ratchet vernier.

7
C. Electrical System

RV6 N19CD is equipped with a full electrical system of 24* volts tension. The system is illustrated in figure II-5. The main buss of the system is contained in the circuit breaker box which is located near the battery (to minimize heavy cable lengths) on the floor between the occupants legs. The circuit breakers are, with one exception, all Potter & Brumfield Series 58 units with ratings of 5, 7, 10 or 15 amps depending on the application. The exception is the master 35 amp breaker which is a P&B Series 23 which can be easily tripped by the pilot. The layout of the breaker panel and the individual values is illustrated in Figure II-2. The main buss is divided into a general section and an avionics buss connected through an avionics master switch on the instrument panel.

Since several desirable options were available only in 12 volt versions, a regulated 12 volt supply is provide. The circuit schematic is shown in Figure II-6. The unit is mounted on the (F6??) left fuselage rib between the subpanel bulkhead and the fire wall immediately under the access hatch on the F6?? foreskin. This unit powers the flap motor, the trim motors and the fuel quantity senders.

Stock items in the electrical system are listed below along with their sources. These were all included in the weight and balance measurement but are not included in the "equipment list" of Table II-1 as they are of a somewhat less "optional" nature.

1. Avionics Stack See Table II-1
2. Starter Sky-Tec Mfng. p/n 149-24HT
3. 35 Amp Alternator A/CS&S p/n 07-04000
      Belt Replacement Gates XL #7350
4. Auxilary Fuel Pump (Facet) A/CS&S p/n 40154
5. Heated Pitot Tube A/CS&S p/n AN5812-1
6. Whelen Ligths: Power Supply A/CS&S p/n 11-14614
     Wing tip strobe & position lights " A650-PG/R-28
     White tail lamp " A500-28-H
7. Landing light Bob Olds (RV options supplier)
     Replacement Lamp A/CS&S p/n (GE) 4626

___________________________

* The debate over 12 vs. 24 volt systems for homebuilt aircraft is one which will doubtless rage for as long as the Sun continues to convert Hydrogen to Helium. The decision to go with the "big airplane" standard for RV6 N19CD was made primarily on the basis of the recommendation of the vendor of the starter which we wanted to use. In a conversation with him at Oshkosh he opined that if one lives in a cold climate (it is -12° F outside as I type this and it's three bloody o'clock in the afternoon I might add) the superior performance of 24 Volt starters is manifest. Several other vendors had similar though less compelling arguments. The argument that one can use lighter weight wires with higher voltage, while true, was not rigorously exploited in this aircraft. The decision has, in fact, proven to have been a bit of a pain in the ass since many aftermarket suppliers (e.g. our flap actuator) work only in 12 volts. But what's done is done, and it is a hell of a lot easier to make 12 volts out of 24 than 24 out of 12; so there.

8

D. Fuel System

The fuel system of RV6 N19CD is illustrated in Figure II-6. The fuel, 100 octane or higher low lead aviation gasoline, is contained in detachable "wet wing" tanks which constitute roughly the inner 40% of the wing span forward of the main spar. Each tank has a capacity of 19 US gallons and can be pumped virtually dry by the auxiliary pump in the three point, level attitude. However, for purposes of flight planning the Pilot In Command should consider the usable fuel to be 18 US gallons per side. The left tank is provided with an inverted flight "flop tube" pickup.

All connections in the system aft of the firewall are made with 37° flare AN fittings and aluminum tube (or copper in the case of the small primer lines forward of the firewall). The reperatory of AN fittings is detailed in Figure II-6. Forward of the firewall major connections are made with Aeroquip 601 hose, fittings and fire sleeve.

NOTE: AEROQUIP 601 HOSES CONDUCTING AVIATION GASOLINE SHOULD BE REPLACED EVERY 24-MONTHS.

THE FITTINGS AND FIRE SLEEVES ARE REUSABLE.

Components of the system which were not provided with the engine (see section II-E) are as follows:

1. Auxilary Fuel Pump (Facet) A/CS&S p/n 40154
2. Primer pump A/CS&S p/n K2404-1/8
3. Gascolator A/CS&S p/n 10560
4. Fuel Selector/Shut Off Valve A/CS&S p/n 108HD-06
5. Inverted Pick Up (Left wing tank) A/CS&S p/n 05-20512
6. Stewart-Warner Fuel Senders (2) A/CS&S p/n 82303
7. Aeroquip Hoses & Fittings Automotive Wholesale Specialists

E. Engine and Propeller

The engine of RV 6 N19CD is a Lycoming O320-D1A obtained new through Van's OEM arrangement with Lycoming. That engine is extensively documented in its own manual and will not be further discussed here except to note that the oil pressure line for constant speed propeller control from the governor box aft to the front of the engine case has been removed and capped off. Engine accouterments not provided with the engine and not noted elsewhere are:

1. Sigma-Tek Dry Air Pump A/CS&S p/n 1U128-005
2. Stainless Steel Exhaust Stacks Larry Vetterer (Van's options supplier)
3. Carb heat / Air filter box Van's option Rplcmt Filter TBD
4. Oil Filter Replacement Champion CH48110 3/4 -16
5. Oil quick drain Aeroquip AE80664H

The propeller is a Sensenich aluminum unit, also a Van's OEM item, of 70 inch diameter and 79 inch pitch. A four inch aluminum billit extender is placed between the engine's starter ring and the propeller.

12

F. Pitot Static System

The pitot static system of RV6 N19CD is shown schematically in Figure II-7. The static ports are simply 1/8 inch pop rivets from which the mandrel was removed after it was set in the fuselage. Static lines are press fit over the inside of the rivet and retained with a generous dose of RTV. Static ports are located on each side of the fuselage roughly half way from wing trailing edge to horizontal stabilizer leading edge. The static line is routed from the right side port across the adjacent bulkhead to a tee near the left port and thence forward to the instrument panel. The pitot tube, identified in section C, is mounted on the left wing spar just outboard of the aileron actuator bell crank. It is provided with its own access port for making AN flared tube fitting and electrical attachments. It is extended below the wing by means of a steel mast made from 4130 MIL-T6736 streamline tubing from Aircraft Spruce (p/n 03-11700) and a flat plate. It was welded up by the Anderson Aircraft Factory, Sterling Hall Division. From the pitot mast to the fuselage aluminum tube is used, but inside the fuselage flexible polly tube is substituted.

G. Vacuum (Gyro Drive) System

The Heading Indicator and the Attitude Indicator gyros are vacuum driven. Primary vacuum is provided by the Sigma Tek engine driven pump identified in section E above. In addition a standby system from Precise Flight Inc.(See separate document volume) which derives it suction from the engine's number 4 cylinder (left aft) intake manifold. Two other components of the system are:

1. Airborne Air Filter A/CS&S p/n 1J7-1
      Replacement filter (500 hour) A/CS&S p/n 9D-18-1
2. Airborne Suction Regulator A/CS&S p/n 2H3-2
      Replacement filter (100 hour) A/CS&S p/n B3-5-1

Both of these items can be accessed for filter change through the avionics access hatch in the foreskin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

 

 

III. Weights and Balances

The weight and center of gravity of RV6 N19CD were measured first on December 12, 1993. The measuring device used was a load cell on loan from the University of Wisconsin Space Astronomy Laboratory. This strain gauge was the same unit used for initial weighing of the the Wisconsin Ultroviolet Photo Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE) which flew as part of NASA's Astro-1 flight of the Spaces Shuttle Columbia, STS 35, in December of 1990. This builder conducted a variety of tests which validated the linearity of the cell out to nearly 500 pounds. The slope of the calibration is not unity, but does appear to be stable. This slope was determined by cross reference to a set of work out weights which were in turn calibrated on a UPS postal scale on the UW campus. The slope used was 0.941, i.e. the actual weight of an object is roughly 6 % LESS than the numerical indication, less the zero point reading, on the load cell read out. The zero point turned out to be temperature and history dependent, and was thus read immediately before and after each of the three points on the aircraft were sampled.

Ramps to facilitate the placement of aircraft on the load cell while leveling it were kindly fabricated by a friend of our hanger partner Robert Beckman.

Results of the measurements are recorded on the forms provided for the purpose by Van's Aircraft and are included in this manual as the following pages. These results and other basic data on the aircraft etc. have been incorporated into a Microsoft ExcelTM spread sheet program and examples of typical loading scenarios are included in this section.

On November 13, 1995 the measurement was repeated after the installation of the Garmin 55 GPS unit and well as to include the paint which had been estimated at 25 lbs. Happily it turned out to be signirficantly less

In summary the results of the weights and balances exercise are a case of bad news and good news. The bad news is that this is not the lightest RV6 ever built, but it can be flown by the builder and his spouse, a reasonable amount of baggage and full fuel without violating Van's envelope. Large passengers are going to be a problem if baggage is to be carried. The good news is that it is virtually impossible to drive the C.G. out the aft end of that envelope.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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IV. Operating Procedures

The operating procedures for RV6 N19CD are presented in the following pages in the form of check lists. These check lists are adapted wholesale from those for the Piper PA28 Cherokees in which the builder flew from 1987 until the completion of the RV6 project. Modifications to the Piper check lists for operation of Cherokees them selves evolved over the course of six years and roughly 400 hours of flying and further modifications have been implemented to reflect the expected differences between the PA28 and the RV 6. Continuing refinement is to be expected.

 
For the Web Version of this Manual we will use links to the check list pages rather than incorporating them

NORMAL PROCEDURES

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES   (still in development)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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V. Performance

Prior to test flights it is clearly impossible to give specific performance figures for RV6 N19CD. This section of the manual will clearly develop over the course of the flight test program and beyond. This manual will be updated accordingly. For the purposes of this pre-test flight edition of this POH&FM we will list as an approximation to the performance figures the results of the CAFE Foundations tests on Steve and Theresa Barnard's RV6A N157ST which appeared in the September 1993, issue of Sport Aviation magazine, p.34.

Vso Stall in landing config. 48 kts / 55 mph at 1650 lbs.
Vs1 Stall in cruse config. 54 kts / 62 mph "
Vx Best angel of climb 71 kts / 82 mph
Vy Best rate of climb 87 kts / 100 mph
Vfo Flap operating 87 kts / 100 mph
Va Maneuvering 117kts/ 135 mph
Vc @ 18.9-in, 2350RPM, 7.8 gph 153.3kts/176.6 mph 9100'den 1620lbs.
Vc @ 21.1-in, 2441RPM, 10.2 gph 158.4kts/182.5 mph 9100'den 1620lbs.
Vmax @24.2-in, 2618RPM,12.2gph 173.4kts/199.7 mph 7080'den 1630lbs.
Vne Never exceed 178 kts / 205 mph
Rate of Climb at Vy 1230 fpm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26

 

 

VI. Specifications

Gross weight 1700 lb.
Wingspan/Chord 23 ft/57.4 in
Wing Area 110 sq.ft.
Wing loading @ gross wt. 115.45 lb/sq.ft.
Power loading, 160 hp, @ gross wt. 10.6 lp/hp
Airfoil 23013.5
Airfoil design lift coefficient 0.3
Airfoil, thickness to chord ratio 13.5
Aspect ratio 4.8
Wing incidence +1°
Wing dihedral +3.5°
Wing taper ratio, root/tip 1.0
Wing washout none
Steering diff. breaking plus steerable tailwheel
Landing Gear Spring steel main and tail wheel
Horizontal stabilizer span/area 9ft / 13.73 sq.ft
Elevator area 10.27 sq.ft.
Vertical stabilizer span/area 4 ft. / 8.35 sq.ft.
Rudder area 5.33 sq.ft.
Thrust line incidence -0.4° (nose down)
Tail incidence 0.0°
Fuselage length 19ft 11in
Static height 5ft. 8in
Minimum turning circle TBD ~ 10 ft.
Main gear track 82.5 in
Wheel base, mains to tail wheel 170 in.
Acceleration limits
   at gross wt +6, -4 g
   at 1350 (aerobatic) wt. +6, -6 g
Engine:Textron Lycombing O320D1a 160 hp
Propeller: Sensenich fixed metal 70 diam, 79 pitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

VII. Maintenance Procedures

A. Engine

Engine maintenance procedures are outlined in the engine manuals and will not be further discussed here.

B. Airframe

Attached is a copy of the check list provided in FAA AC 90-87 as a suggestion for the 12 month condition review required of aircraft registered in the experimental homebuilt category. This will form the basis of our regular program of maintenance. Refinements of this section are to be expected.

Beyond the above regular condition review we note the following items peculiar to this particular aircraft and its systems:

1. Vacuum pressure regulator filter.................................100 hour replace
2. Vacuum inlet filter .....................................................500 hour replace
3. Aeroquip 601 fuel hoses............................................... 2 year replace
4. Pitot static system and altitude encoder .........................2 year calibration
5. ELT battery................................................................ 2 year replace *
6. Champion CH48110 3/4-16 Thread ........................ Replace every TBD hours

 
 

*  Herein lies a story.  The ELT was received from Van's about one year before flight, so after about 10.5 months of flying I ordered a new ELT battery from Air Craft Spruce.   They sent the wrong thing.  Called and got RMA and sent it back while they sent another.  Same wrong part arrives.   After many go-arounds and a couple of months of not flying out of the local area (fortunately I had no trips planned) I got the right battery, cost $50 (and months of agrivation for both me and the A/CS&S Customer Service Lady)    As the next replacement date  approached I decided to first dissect the original batery to see what was what.  To my utter disbelief, it was nothing more than 7 Duracell  D-Cells spot welded together in series and shrink wrapped into a flat pack.  I hied myself to the local Batteries-Plus outlet and they reproduced the pack for $15, only $2 more than the retail price of 8 D-cells (they only sell Duracells in pairs).  I bet the  Customer Service Lady would be relieved to know I won't be bothering her again.