Welcome, 2013/14 Class of Grad Students

Sep 09, 2013

The UW-Madison Astronomy Department welcomes the incoming 2013/2014 class of graduate students.

Elijah Bernstein-Cooper has a BS degree in physics, with an astronomy emphasis, from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. His areas of interest are the role that atomic hydrogen gas plays in the shielding and formation of molecular hydrogen in giant molecular clouds and the context of low-mass dwarf galaxies in the evolution of galaxies. He is working with Professor Snezana Stanimirovic on answering what role atomic hydrogen plays in the formation of molecular hydrogen in giant molecular clouds.

Yi-Hao Chen has a MS degree in astrophysics from Ludwig-Maximillian University in Munich, Germany and a BS degree in physics from National Taiwan University in Taipei. His areas of interest focus mainly on structure formation in the universe, including MHD simulation around compact objects and their impact on cosmic structure. Other interests include weak gravitational lensing. He is working with Professor Sebastian Heinz on studying the effect of the magnetic field on the jets from compact objects when they are moving through the environment.

Tim Haines has a BS degree in physics, mathematics and computer science, with an electrical and computer engineering emphasis, from the University of Missouri in Kansas City. His areas of interest include using massively parallel computing systems such as GPU clusters to perform astronomical simulations at extremely high resolution. He is working with Professor Elena D’Onghia to apply these computing systems to current simulation codes to increase the speed and resolution of both cosmological-scale and galactic-scale simulations.

Stephen Pardy has a BS degree in physics from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. His areas of interest include using numerical simulations and a wide range of observations to understand the evolution of bars and disks in Magellanic type galaxies, especially after merger events. He is also involved in projects on the atomic and molecular ISM in galaxies. He is working with Professor Elena D’Onghia.

Charee Peters has a MA degree in physics from the Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge Program and a BS degree in physics from the University of Denver (Colorado). Her areas of interest are understanding galaxy evolution and structure through radio observations, specifically, probing the neutral atomic hydrogen and cold gas content in galaxies using VLA observations. She has worked on modeling spectra of supernovae and typing supernova remnants. She is working with Professor Eric Wilcots on observing HI regions (interstellar clouds of neutral hydrogen) in intermediate galaxies to better understand star formation, galaxy formation and evolution, and/or cosmic magnetic fields.

Brianna Smart has a BS degree in astronomy and physics from the University of Arizona in Tucson. She has worked on measuring the motions of stars in the Magellanic Clouds with NOAO astronomer Knut Olsen (La Serena, Chile), classifying and identifying interesting massive stars in M31 and M33 with astronomer Phil Massey at Lowell Observatory (Flagstaff, Arizona), and observing extra-solar planets to constrain their parameters and possibly identifying magnetic fields with the University of Arizona Astronomy Club research group. She is working with Senior Scientist Matt Haffner on studying the ISM. 

Andrea Vang has a BA degree in physics from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. Her areas of interest include galaxy formation and their evolution. Other interests are the different phenomena that occur in merging galaxies. She is working with Senior Scientist Marsha Wolf on post-starburst galaxies.

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